FEATURE | Japan is back in the Bay of Bengal

The eastern Indian Ocean has become contested waters. The competition for position between China, India and the US is becoming ever more pronounced. But some recent developments indicate that Japan also intends to become an important security player in the region. Japan is back in the Bay of Bengal.

FEATURE | Promoting coastal ecosystems conservation in the Indian Ocean

I had the opportunity to attend, as part of the Malaysian delegation, the recent Indian Ocean Conference on Blue Carbon held in Perth, Australia. This forum was organised by the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) and the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade in collaboration with the Indian Ocean Rim Association (IORA), from March 19 to 23, 2018 at the Indian Ocean Marine Research Centre in Western Australia.

FEATURE | Understanding India and China’s evolving Indian Ocean roles

Beijing claims the South China Sea as China’s own. But it completely rejects any notion that the Indian Ocean should be treated either as India’s ocean or as an Indian preserve. The implications of these inconsistent positions may become increasingly important in the China–India relationship, and have important consequences for other countries in the region.

OPINION: A new order for the Indo-Pacific

Security dynamics are changing rapidly in the Indo-Pacific. The region is home not only to the world’s fastest-growing economies, but also to the fastest-increasing military expenditures and naval capabilities, the fiercest competition over natural resources, and the most dangerous strategic hot spots. One might even say that it holds the key to global security.

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